The Chesapeake Watershed used across the region by Master Naturalist programs

Watershed

 

A copy of Ned Tillman’s book The Chesapeake Watershed: A sense of place and a call to action is presented to each of the participants in the University of Maryland sponsored Master Naturalist programs. If you are interested in these programs contact one of the following sponsoring sites.

There are 31 Master Naturalist program Host Sites in 12 Maryland counties (plus Baltimore City and in Washington, DC) with one program (DNR) using volunteers state-wide. They include:

 

  • Adkins Arboretum (Caroline)
  • American Chestnut Land Trust (Calvert)
  • Anita C. Leight Estuary Center (Harford)
  • Audubon Naturalist Society (Montg.)
  • Co. Environmental Protection & Sustainability (Balt.) (2017)
  • Banneker Historical Park (Balt.)
  • Bear Branch/Piney Run Nature Centers (Carroll)
  • Brookside Nature Center (Montg.)/Montgomery Parks (Countywide)
  • Catoctin Creek Nature Center (Fred.)
  • Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center (Queen Anne’s)
  • Cromwell Valley Park (Balt.)
  • Cunningham Falls/Gambrill State Parks (Fred.)
  • Cylburn Arboretum (Balt.)
  • Eden Mill Nature Center (Harford)
  • Elms Environmental Education Center (St. Mary’s)
  • Fountain Rock Nature Center (Fred.)
  • Hashawha Environmental Education Center (Carroll)
  • Howard County Conservancy (Howard)
  • Howard CC – Belmont (Howard)
  • Irvine Nature Center (Balt.)
  • Lake Roland Park (formerly R.E. Lee) (Balt.)
  • Locust Grove & Meadowside Nature Centers (Montg.)/Montgomery Parks (Countywide)
  • Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources Wildlife & Heritage Service (A.A./Statewide)
  • Marshy Point Nature Center (Balt.)
  • Masonville Cove Environmental Education Center (Balt. City)
  • National Aquarium (Balt. City)
  • Phillips Wharf Environmental Center (Talbot)
  • Pickering Creek Audubon Center (Talbot)
  • Oregon Ridge Nature Center (Balt.)
  • Quiet Waters Park/Anne Arundel County Rec & Parks (Anne Arundel)
  • Robinson Nature Center (Howard)

If you are interested in multiple copies of The Chesapeake Watershed, volume discounts, or classroom sets please contact: ned@sustainable.us

 

 

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Welcome

NedWelcome to our online community created to help you save the places you love. Please signup to receive blogposts by scrolling down to bottom of lower right column.  Like us on Facebook and share the posts with friends. Check out other tabs, e.g., Books, Events, and Resources. We welcome your guest posts and all ideas that might help others. You can contact me if I can be of help or if you would like a speaker at your next event.

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Turkeys, Eagles, and Pileated Woodpeckers, Oh My!!

Not a bad day. Aside from bluebirds, gold finches, and cardinals fighting over my bird feeder this morning, a full grown pileated woodpecker landed on the top of the pole holding the feeder. He gave me a great display for at least 20-30 seconds. Fabulous.

I was then lucky enough to catch a bald eagle fly by and land in a tree this morning. so I decided to go for a walk and saw a turkey run across the path out of the wetlands by Lake Elkhorn. I had not seen one here in this green buffer before.

Not a bad day, indeed.

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Don’t Miss These 8 Upcoming Events

daffysIn these challenging times, I would like to invite you to the following events which are designed to build community and to raise awareness of how we can save the places we love.

I will be there and hope to see you too.

Ned Tillman

March 2017 – Events to celebrate Columbia’s 50th Birthday 

  • Friday, March 24, 7pm – Storytelling Performances at Owen Brown Interfaith Center
  • Saturday, March 25, 2 to 6pm – Storytelling Workshop at Owen Brown Interfaith Center
  • Sunday, March 26, 11am, Walk in Downtown Columbia – meet at the People Tree at the Lakefront

April 2017

  • Thursday, April 20, 10 am, Explore Columbia Walk
  • Thursday, April 20, 5 pm, Book of the Year Lecture at HC Central Library
  • Friday, April 21, Storytelling Performances at Conservancy at 7pm
  • Friday, April 21, 2 to 6 – Storytelling Workshop at HoCo Conservancy
  • Saturday, April 22, Greenfest at Howard Community College – 11am to 4pm

For a more complete list of activities and for more detail click here, or contact me at ned@sustainable.us

 

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New Release – Coming of Age and Finding Your Place

 

Dunlop book-coming-of-age-smallGuest Post by Author Julie Dunlap

Growing up has always been tough. But the millennial generation, my young adult children’s cohort, faced especially daunting challenges. The 9/11 terror attacks, Hurricane Katrina, the BP oil spill, and SuperStorm Sandy, along with melting ice caps and bleaching coral reefs, have been formative events in their youths and childhoods, shaping their understanding of people and planet along with their maturing characters. As an environmentalist and a parent of four, I wondered and worried how early experiences of a shifting and troubled Earth may alter young adults’ attachments to place and the natural world.

To explore these questions, I joined with Anne Arundel Community College professor Susan A. Cohen (also a mom of two millennials) to collect essays by young writers grappling with growing up in an era replete with environmental and social crises. The result is a new anthology, published this month by Trinity University Press—Coming of Age at the End of Nature: A Generation Faces Living on a Changed Planet. The collection’s title alludes to Bill McKibben’s book, The End of Nature, published in 1989 before many of our contributors were born. In the 1990s, McKibben’s best-seller introduced me and millions of other then-young parents to the looming threats of climate change and humanity’s ubiquitous alterations of our basic natural systems.

Perhaps anger was the emotion I most expected at the project’s outset, and some Coming of Age contributors do rail against their earthly inheritance, against the losses imposed as forests shrink and oceans sully. Yet others question older generations’ ideas, rejecting the view that a tourist-thronged canyon is inherently compromised, and insisting that pristine wilderness need not be the ultimate definition of natural beauty. Many find ways to celebrate remaining pockets of tenacious nature, the return of raptors to urban parks, or the rejuvenation of community through sharing food foraged in the wild. And most heartening of all, woven through essay after essay, are feelings of love, of home, and of commitment to a thriving future. Far from the entitled laggards of media myth, these young people are seizing and creating opportunities to protest, study, plant, explore, build, teach, and of course write about the challenges they face and the solutions they foresee. McKibben, in his generous foreword to Coming of Age at the End of Nature, praises the essays as “mature, reflective, deep, and lovely,” but also and most of all “hopeful.”

Of course, I still wonder and worry about what lies ahead for my children and yours, as places and processes we knew to be timeless transform at an accelerating pace. But thanks to the youthful voices in this collection, I know the rising millennial generation has roots in their Earth, deep and wide, and the resilience to face whatever comes next.

 

Julie Dunlap is a writer, editor, and educator living in Columbia, Maryland. For more information about Coming of Age at the End of Nature: A Generation Faces Living on a Changed Planet, please visit: http://tupress.org/books/coming-of-age-at-the-end-of-nature .

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“Saving the Places we Love” is HoCo Book Selection of the Year.

bookI am delighted to share the great news that Saving the Places we Love, my second book, has been picked as the Howard County Book Connection selection for 2016-2017. The book was chosen by the Howard Community College, the Howard County Library System, and Hocopolitso.

You can join the county-wide discussion to see how we can create a more sustainable community by ordering a copy of the book from Amazon. If your community or organization would like to buy multiple copies, volume discounts are available at ned@sustainable.us. All proceeds go toward efforts to improve our environment.

 

 

Please come participate in the following events:

  1. Thursday, October 20, 2016, 7pm. Meet the Author: Ned Tillman – Saving the Places We Love at the Miller Branch of the Library. RSVP
  1. Wednesday, October 26, 2016, 11 am. Nature Walk Howard Community College Campus on College Sustainability Day.
  1. Tuesday, April 18, 2017, 3:30pm. Keynote, Q&A, book signing, and reception at Howard Community College, 3:30pm – 5pm.
  2. Thursday, April 20, 2017, 7:00pm. Presentation on Saving The Places We Love at the Main Branch of the Howard County Library System.

Please feel free to contact me at ned@sustainable.us if you would like to create another event for your friends, your community, or your business or non-profit organization.

 

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Ocean friendly choices for the consumer

Guest post by Mark Southerland, PhD

edible 6 packWe are all familiar with the pervasive effect of electronic devices on communication worldwide. Nearly everyone uses texts, emails, digital documents, e-books, and social media as their primary means for conducting business and personal affairs. This has allowed communication to grow exponentially without a concomitant increase in paper production. It is now common knowledge that everyone can make specific consumer choices to save paper, and the forests that produce it, such as by receiving financial statements and medical records electronically.  There are, however, many other inventions that provide consumers an environmentally friendly choice. Here are two recent inventions where the consumer can choose to reduce their impact on our marine ecosystems.

  1. Reduced, recycled, compostable, and edible packaging – six-pack rings that fish can eat

The change to more environmentally friendly packaging for consumer products has been a more gradual evolution, often associated with advent of environmental brands of products and stores. The most recent innovation in packaging is the creation of an edible six-pack ring from barley waste produced in beer brewing .This product addresses the tragic effect that six-pack rings have on sea life through entanglement and ingestion, resulting in thousands of deaths of fish, birds, and sea turtles each year.

  1. Guilt-free seafood — removing invasive species by eating them

Lion fishRecognition of the declines in fish populations and other seafood species spawned the sustainable seafood movement in the 1990s, producing lists of sustainable seafood that has been caught or farmed in ways that protect the long-term vitality of harvested species. While many consumers make their seafood choice based on these lists of sustainable alternatives, such as Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch, there is now the opportunity to seek out invasive species for your dinner plate. Wegmans in Columbia (and at other stores throughout the country) has recently added lionfish to their shelves. The red lionfish of the Indo-Pacific, whose populations have exploded in the subtropical waters of the southeastern U.S. and Caribbean, is devastating local coral reef ecosystems. Let’s work together and help remove these fish by eating them.

Take-a-way: These are two easy steps that you can take to make a difference and to encourage more innovation like this.

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Get outside and enjoy the end of summer.

IronweedWe had a great hike around Kendall Ridge, Maryland on this past Thursday. I bet you have never been there. It was a 2 mile walk – part of the 120 miles of paths in Howard County. It was 1 of 10 walks I am leading this year for the Columbia Association.

The woods have changed so much over the past few weeks. Dark green canopies cover the paths. Noonday cicadas drown out all human noise including the airplanes, and Joe Pye, Ironweed, jewelweed and golden rod offer a bit of color.

Grape.360Part of the difference in the woods or the edges of the woods is the result of the vines taking over the forests. All the trees were magically draped with vines climbing up 10, 30, 60 feet covering trees of all sizes. We saw a range of grapevines (fox, summer, riverbank, etc.), Virginia creeper, poison ivy, English ivy, cut-thumb/mile-a-minute, porcelain berry, honeysuckle, and trumpet vine.

It was a special walk along boardwalks reaching across streams, floodplains, and engineered wetlands. We saw stressed sycamores and locust trees, lots of black walnuts, and a series of dying ash trees. It was interesting to envision what life must have been like pre-colonization, and after Daniel Kendall received his 400 and 500 acre land grants back in 1701 (Kendall’s Delight and Kendall’s Enhancement). The forests are recovering as are the streams and a whole host of flora and fauna, including many native and non-native species. It is a seldom visited path that extends sound from the Kendall Ridge Pool. Go try it one day. You will forget you live in a city.

Take-a-way: For a list of future hikes this fall visit this schedule of events. Don’t leave the trails just to the PokemonGo searchers!

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Ellicott City Floods – The Need to be Proactive

ellicott-city-flood-july-31-2016-3-CREDIT-Scott-Weaver

Ellicott City Flood 7/30/16 photo by Cody Goodin

Many of us want to know what we can do to help our neighbors in Ellicott City. We feel a strong need to react to this incident. I am sure there are some short term things that could help reduce human suffering. Our hearts go out to those who have lost loved ones, their homes, and businesses.

But fixing this city built in a creek is not a simple thing, especially with the expectations of more frequent and bigger storms. We need to be very thoughtful on how we proceed. We need to be reactive and proactive in our response.

The greatest opportunity to help our neighbors in Ellicott City and across the entire county and country are the actions that we take tomorrow, next week, and next year. We all need to be much more proactive in order to reduce the deaths and damage to our greater community in the future.

Storm waters do need to be managed better. We have known this for years. We all need to step up and put in rain gardens to capture rainfall and slow the flow of water off our properties. We also need to adequately fund the restoration of our storm water management systems.

But we also need to do whatever it takes to reduce the growing threat of more and bigger storms (rain and snow) resulting from the warming and moister atmosphere. We as a community have not taken this threat seriously, yet. We are not talking about it enough. We are not doing enough. There is so much more that we can do as individuals, businesses, and communities. We need to get serious and start doing it. Each of us can take steps at home and where we work. We each need to reduce our use of fossil fuels as much as possible to slow climate change and reduce these big storms. We can do that by:

  • reducing energy use in our homes by insulating attics and upgrading appliances.
  • reducing fossil fuel energy use by buying our electricity from solar and wind farms
  • reducing fuel use by driving less and using more efficient cars.
  • buying less stuff and always insisting on the most sustainable products.

Let’s support our neighbors both short term and long term by acting now to create a safer future. These are simple, concrete things that each of us can do today that will help prevent the next big catastrophe.

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Guest Blog – About Mosquitoes and Mosquito Control

By Danielle Bodner, Columbia Association

backyard enviMosquitoes are a summer buzzword, and for good reason. They can ruin outdoor time by mercilessly biting people and leaving nasty welts. Having spent a lot of time catching and staring at the tiny annoyances, I tend to look at mosquitoes in a different light.

Only female mosquitoes bite. The females bite to obtain the protein in blood that they need to produce eggs. There are many different species of mosquitoes, and some don’t bite humans. While all mosquitoes spend their first days swimming in water, different species prefer different types of water. From the salt marshes on the Eastern Shore to rock pools, woodland streams and backyard containers filled with rain water, there are many different places that the various mosquitoes breed.

The Asian Tiger mosquito is widespread in Maryland and particularly interesting. She prefers breeding close to homes and will lay eggs in as little as a bottle cap of water. You can distinguish them by the white and black striped legs and the white line down the head/ thorax.

The Asian Tiger bites all day long and does not fly very far from where they emerge. While not the primary Zika virus vector, the Asian Tiger mosquito could potentially spread Zika to humans. The Asian Tiger are more opportunistic than the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that are spreading Zika in Central and South America. This means that while female Ae. aegypti almost exclusively bite humans (requirement for Zika transmission), the female Asian Tiger are biting the first source of blood they find (i.e. dog, cat, bird, rodent, etc.), which will make it much more difficult for local transmission of the virus.

The 16 cases of local transmission of the Zika virus in Miami have been from the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Maryland is the extreme range for Aedes aegypti. Although they are technically here, it is in very low population density.

mosquitos

Asian Tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and larvae

Columbia Association conducts active mosquito surveillance in its open space, including identifying any mosquitoes found and encouraging natural mosquito predators, such as birds, fish, frogs, and other insects.  Columbia Association also provides public education through teaching residents about mosquito ecology, breeding sites and how to eliminate mosquitoes from their yards and help prevent diseases carried by mosquitoes.

The most difficult facet of mosquito control is convincing people to find and eliminate standing water in their backyard. You’re probably shaking your head right now, saying, “There isn’t any water in my yard,” but that is exactly the problem. Mosquitoes aren’t shining a light at you and holding signs saying, “Here we are!”

The backyard container breeders, like the Asian Tiger, are sneaky. This is exactly how they’ve managed to invade the eastern United States in such a short time.

Earlier this summer, I washed my car and left the empty wash bucket outside. Out of sight, out of mind; it sat for a week or two. Later when I went to retrieve the bucket, I found less than an inch of water in the bottom and enough larvae/wigglers to ruin a summer barbecue. It just goes to show that even the most diligent backyard mosquito hunter can still have standing water.

Take-a-way:Empty the water from buckets, tarps, planter dishes, birdbaths, bins, and watering cans on a weekly basis. This is the best way to take back your yard and reduce the mosquito population.

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Pokemon GO is brilliant – Whatever it takes to get people outside.

Pokemon GoI love the fact that I am seeing hundreds of people of all ages out on the paths during these hot days of summer. It took me a few minutes to appreciate what they were doing: they are all playing Pokémon GO “which allows you to find and catch more than a hundred virtual species of Pokémon as you explore your surroundings with your IPhone or Android device.”

I am still trying to understand why they are doing it. I did ask this question and received the following comments listed below. I think there is some real potential here for getting more people out of their basements and off of their couches to explore the real world while playing a virtual game. As you can see in some of the comments, these folks are starting to appreciate some of the paths and the special places that our ancestors have saved for us. Maybe a few of them will become stewards as well.

Kathy Smith It’s fun! It gets me outside, it allows me to talk with the people around me, and I’m learning a lot of trivia about the physical spaces around me (almost all of the pokestops where you can get virtual prizes are historical, artistic, or local landmarks). I’m really enjoying it. Yes, it’s a silly game, and yes, I’m a geek – but on the other hand, how many people play solitaire, or minesweeper, or any one of a hundred other games on their phones or tablets? But no one ever says anything about that … mostly because they’re sitting inside, alone. I’m enjoying this game that seems to be bringing people out and bringing people together.I’m highly enthusiastic about this game, Ned. I haven’t walked this much (regularly) since my walking partner up and moved to North Carolina.

Judy O’Keefe Kelsey says it helps learn the metric system and they are using it in PT to encourage kids to move. All good in my book as long as caution is used. I’m wondering if we’ll see this in the winter

Jen Cook I stopped to hunt Pokémon at a spot I’ve driven by all of my life. I’ve never seen egrets there before, just geese and ducks.

Chas Parr The week after it came out I accidentally walked more than six miles to Wilde Lake and back. I think it is a very positive influence despite the naysayers.

Ken Crandell I saw a ton of them roaming around Pismo Beach pier at night, too. Glued to their phone, but outside and walking, with some interaction with other actual real live people. So, it’s an encouraging development.

Sherry S. Wechsler While I am clueless about Pokemon Go, right after it was released my daughter Rebecca posted this: “Ok, I am not usually a big fan of apps and video games but am really a big fan of this new Pokemon Go. In the past few days We have walked over 10 kilometers, hiked Patapsaco Park, discovered a nature trail by our home, and walked our entire neighborhood multiple times. My kids have been outside nonstop and had a blast. We live in a digital world and if this gets people out and moving than I am all for it.” They have continued to explore. Of course, I did find myself in my typical Mom/Grandmother style cautioning her to make sure they all watch where they are walking and stay away from traffic, don’t focus on phone in parking lots, avoid cliffs, edges of swimming pools and watch for bicycles. 😊

Carol Weisman I still don’t understand the appeal of bellbottoms.

Take-a-way: I have been searching for ways to get younger generations outdoors. This game has done just that. It is now up to them to see what happens next.

 

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